Bug bite symptom

This crossword clue is for the definition: Bug bite symptom.
it’s A 16 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, when searching for online help with your puzzle, try using the search term “Bug bite symptom crossword” or “Bug bite symptom crossword clue”. The possible answerss for Bug bite symptom are listed below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!.

Possible Answers: Itch.

Last seen on: Daily Celebrity Crossword – 1/31/20 Sports Fan Friday

Random information on the term “Itch”:

The body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus, sometimes called Pediculus humanus corporis) is a hematophagic louse that infests humans. The condition of being infested with head lice, body lice, or pubic lice is known as pediculosis. Body lice are vectors for the transmission of the human diseases epidemic typhus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. The body louse genome sequence analysis was published in 2010.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

Pediculus humanus humanus (the body louse) is indistinguishable in appearance from Pediculus humanus capitis (the head louse) but will interbreed only under laboratory conditions. In their natural state, they occupy different habitats and do not usually meet. In particular, body lice have evolved to attach their eggs to clothes, whereas head lice attach their eggs to the base of hairs.

The life cycle of the body louse consists of three stages: egg (also called a nit), nymph, and adult.

The body louse diverged from the head louse at around 100,000 years ago, hinting at the time of the origin of clothing. Body lice were first described by Carl Linnaeus in the 10th edition of Systema Naturae. The human body louse had its genome sequenced in 2010, and at that time it had the smallest known insect genome. Other lice that infest humans are the head louse and the crab louse. The claws of these three species are adapted to attachment to specific hair diameters.

Itch on Wikipedia